8 Quality Webinar Resources for Nonprofits

Looking for free or affordable learning opportunities regarding nonprofit work? Here are some webinars produced by reputable sources in the nonprofit sector, for the nonprofit sector.

1. Foundation Center – Some topics include an overview of the funding research process for individuals working in the arts, including visual and performing artists, creative writers, filmmakers, etc. and an introduction to the world of corporate support and to the effective utilization of the Foundation Center’s resources on corporate giving.

2. NTen – Topics include “Become a Facebook Rockstar” and “The Constituent Pyramid – Using Social Media To Convert Followers Into Supporters.”

3. Network for Good – A free training series on nonprofit marketing and online fundraising, supported by Network for Good and guest speakers.

4. Idealist – According to their web site, these webinars are “designed to help career service professionals understand and speak to the unique issues around the nonprofit career search.”

5. VolunteerMatch – This site’s Learning Center includes introductory and advanced nonprofit webinars from best practs for recruiting online to engaging pro bono and skilled volunteers.

6. TechSoup – These online seminars help to make technology make sense for nonprofits. Topics include online video, mobile technology for advocacy and activism and creating effective surveys.

7. GuideStar – This nonprofit reporting company offers a broad range of topics suitable for nonprofits and professionals who work with or provide services to the sector, some related to their site and services and other more general topics.

8. Wild Apricot – This software company produces quality content and webinars for nonprofits, both sessions to introduce their membership management tools as well as broader topics such as “Competing with Social Networks: Recruiting Members in the Facebook Age.”

When it comes to convenient and affordable learning opportunities, clearly webinars are a viable option for anyone involved in the nonprofit sector.

What webinars do you recommend for nonprofits?

 

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Why Your Organization Should Have a Facebook Page

a version of this blog post originally appeared on The Foraker Group blog.

This post is part of a series of posts I’m writing to help demystify social media tools and to give nonprofit organizations concrete steps they can take to use these tools to enhance their communications; better engage their constituents (and donors, and volunteers); and build their brand in new ways to new audiences.

What is a Facebook Page?

Because The Foraker Group is an organization, we’ve set up a presence on Facebook – the most popular social network on the Internet – using a Facebook Page. A Page on Facebook is different from a Profile which you as an individual might have as a Facebook member. Pages are for companies, organizations, products, celebrities and other entities or individuals wanting a more professional presence on Facebook.

Some organizations – including many in Alaska – have set up Profiles instead of Pages. They may have done this a year or so ago when Pages weren’t as prevalent, and they have probably built a large friends list over time. Unfortunately, if an organization has a Facebook Profile instead of a Facebook Page, they are at risk of losing the content and contacts they’ve accumulated because they are in violation of Faceboook’s Terms of Service i.e. the fine print in your Facebook user agreement. Facebook regularly disables Facebook Profiles that they deem a violation of their rules.

You can immediately tell the difference between a Facebook Page and a Facebook Profile because Pages have Fans while Profiles have Friends.

An important difference between a Facebook Page and a Facebook Profile is that a Page is publicly accessible to people who are not members of Facebook so it becomes a powerful Web presence for your organization that shows up in Google Searches. Facebook Profiles are only accessible by your Facebook Friends which means someone must be a member of Facebook and then send you a Friend request (which you must accept) in order to interact with your organization through your Profie.

Benefits of Using Facebook Pages

How can your organization benefit from a Facebook Page? Many nonprofits are limited in budgets and resources for outreach to constituents, donors, the media and the public. While a web site can serve as an effective destination for an organization, many people these days consider web sites as places for background and archived information rather than an active and dynamic communications tool.

Also the money and time costs of designing, building and maintaining a web site can be a burden, particularly if an organization’s site was not designed with an easy-to-use content management system. Many nonprofit organizations are saddled with outdated web sites where they are at the mercy of Web developers for even the most simple updates.

Other organizations use their web sites as repositories of information, for a list of services, to house a calendar of events, but when it comes to outreach, they are relying on an electronic newsletter – or even a print newsletter – to get the word out about their organization and important events. These days, a web site by nature is too static – and often too overloaded with information – to serve as a consistent outreach tool for shorter, more frequent messages.

While a blog is a useful tool to publish content more frequently, a blog can also be a burden on an organization’s resources if they aren’t equipped to publish content on a very regular basis.

A Facebook Page doesn’t demand the same kind of content publishing and is instead a more conversational resource where shorter bits of information – usually with a link to additional information – is the norm.

Using a Facebook Page Effectively

At the very minimum, here are a few things you should do with your Facebook Page:

1. Connect your blog to Page. If you have one, add your blog’s RSS feed URL to the Notes section of your Facebook Page so when you post to your blog, it automatically updates your Page.

2. Add Facebook Events. If you hold events, particularly regularly occuring events, you can use the Facebook Events feature to augment your Page. The Events tool integrates with your Page, and you can use it to spread the word about classes, meetings, etc. using a tool that makes it easy for others to invite their own Facebook friends to your event.

3. Link to Resources. While Status Updates can be intimidating for some people, updating your Facebook Page doesn’t have to be hard. Connecting your blog updates your Page status as does adding new events. You can also post links to relevant resources including those on your organization’s web site as well as others on the Web.

4. Respond to Comments. As you gather more Fans on your Page, people may start commenting on your Status Updates. A quick response is always appreciated and helps strengthen relationships. Your response doesn’t have to be long – just an answer to a question or acknowledgement of what they’ve said. While it is important to interact with your Page Fans, don’t feel obligated to respond to every single comment, but don’t ignore them all either.

5. Favorite Like-Minded Organizations’ Pages. If you are visiting another Alaska nonprofit or company Page that you think might be relevant to your own Facebook Fans, you can click on the link on the upper left side of their Page and choose Add This Page to My Page’s Favorites. Then add their Page to your Page. This will appear in a box on the left side of your Facebook Page Wall with their logo and a link to their Page. It is appropriate to ask them to Favorite your Page back, however, reciprocity is not an obligation here.

Facebook Pages are easy to set up and easier to maintain than a web site or blog. They also give you a direct communications channel to the people who you serve or who you want to reach with important messages about your organization. And when one person interacts with your Facebook Page, that action can be seen by dozens or even hundreds of their Facebook Friends giving your organization an instant and exponential reach beyond your own contacts.

Does your organization have a Facebook Page? If so, please include a link to it here so we can visit it!

11 Reasons Why Nonprofits Don’t Use Social Media

This post originally appeared on Social Media Mama.

Baby EinsteinNonprofit organizations are discovering the power of social media, some faster than others. There was recently a lot of backlash over a post by Seth Godin titled The problem with non.

For many people, his words seemed unfair when he said that many nonprofits use excuses like “lack of resources” or a seemingly inherent “resistance to change” attitude to avoid social media. I have to say I agree with most of what he said, first because I experience what he has experienced every day as a speaker, teacher, and consultant to nonprofit organizations. And second, because even if you disagree, this conversation must happen again and again until things change for the better.

While I agree with most of what Seth says in his post, I don’t agree with this statement:

Of course, some folks, like charity: water are stepping into the void and raising millions of dollars as a result. They’re not necessarily a better cause, they’re just more passionate about making change.

Seth, it isn’t MORE PASSION that makes a group like charity: water effective at stepping into the void. It is because they more fully embrace the changes in the ways we communicate. I’m sure nobody at charity: water will claim more passion for their cause than folks busting their tails for other good causes. I’m sure everybody at charity: water will say their buy-in to understand, use and leverage social media tools and the new ways we all communicate made a huge difference.

For the record, on a near daily basis I hear these things from people working in the nonprofit sector:

11 Reasons Nonprofits Give For Not Using Social Media

1. I don’t understand it.

2. I don’t have time.

3. We don’t have the resources.

4. We don’t even know where to start.

5. It’s overwhelming.

6. I can’t figure out how to use it for my organization.

7. There are legal issues we can’t sort out.

8. I don’t know how to avoid the “crazies.”

9. Our firewall won’t let us use these tools.

10. We’re still trying to figure out how to update our web site.

11. We are afraid our employees will waste time with these tools.

Personally, I have solid, reasonable, practical tips to overcome each of the above (which will be an upcoming blog post).

Back to Seth Godin’s post. I whole heartedly agree with this statement:

The marketing world has changed completely. So has the environment for philanthropic giving. So have the attitudes of a new generation of philanthropists. But if you look at the biggest charities in the country, you couldn’t tell. Because they’re ‘non’ first, change second.

Anyone involved with a nonprofit or any consultant working with a nonprofit who DISAGREES with the above – i.e. the fact that many nonprofits are ‘non’ first, change second –  consider yourself LUCKY to be working in an environment where the fear of change does not dominate, especially of changing and new technologies.

For those of us who are not so lucky – meaning we witness this fear day after day – it is up to us to be the teachers. Evangelizing social media, no matter how passionate, can fall on deaf ears when others are listening through a filter of fear. We need to step back, dial down our enthusiasm for a moment, hold someone’s hand (figuratively and in some cases literally), and present sensible and rational reasons WHY and HOW a nonprofit can use social media regardless of resource limits and regardless of fear.

Channel the fear you encounter from others into something more like caution so that they at least try something; dipping a toe in a pool before they swim in an ocean.

It is up to us to lead the way. If nonprofits – organizations charged with good work for good causes – are behind when it comes to social media, it is OUR FAULTS.

What are YOU doing to help nonprofit organizations get up to speed with today’s technologies and communications tools?

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Social Media Goodness Podcast Show #2

socialmediagood150Culled from these very blog pages, here’s the 2nd show for Social Media Goodness.

Should nonprofit organizations use social media? Why? How?

Listen to Social Media Goodness.

Would love to know your thoughts!

Social Media Goodness Podcast #1

Started up a new little podcast.

socialmediagood150This is geared toward nonprofit organizations & do-gooders wanting to learn how to use social media marketing for social good.

Will define terminology, explain tools, give brief case studies, etc. and hope it is helpful!

Listen to Social Media Goodness.

Dissecting Social Media Workshops at The Chronicle of Philanthropy

AngerI enjoy the “live” discussions at The Chronicle of Philanthropy although I must admit I’m a bit surprised that they don’t do their live chats with a live chat client but instead rely on an auto-refreshing page. Still, they are touching on some of the key issues surrounding nonprofits using social media sites like Digg, Facebook and Twitter so that’s a great service to anyone in the nonprofit world who is struggling to make sense out of these new tools.

I do, however, have some bones to pick about their discussions.

First, they don’t seem to vary their experts. What I found from the initial discussion on the topic of social media that I attended in November was that their guests – Chris Garrett, author of ProBlogger: Secrets for Blogging Your Way to a Six-Figure Income, and John Haydon, a sales consultant and author of Twitter Jump Start: The Complete Guide for Small Nonprofits – don’t seem to have well-rounded backgrounds in social media. I took issue with much of their advice the first time around although they also did provide some good advice intermittently.

So I was surprised that they brought on the same experts for a second round rather than bringing in some fresh voices and perspectives. Maybe they thought they were offering continuity to their readers, however, what really concerns me is that the nonprofit world could and should be benefiting from advice from the top minds of social media – all of whom are willing to participate and provide their expertise – and yet through The Chronicle of Philanthropy, nonprofits are limited to two perspectives, both of which are more narrow in scope.

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Why Nonprofits Should Use Social Media

When it comes to marketing, nonprofits – like many companies – tend to go for the familiar. What do we know? What have we done in the past? Direct mail? Check. A print newsletter? Check. A fundraising event? Check.

Whether or not these tactics have actually been successful in the past, they tend to be the typical course of action. Even if they are not cost effective or time efficient, more often than not, everyone at an organization can at least agree on the statement “that’s the way we’ve always done it.”

business team standing

Unfortunately, today’s funders and constituents are no longer consuming their information in the same ways. Today’s marketing tactics are not familiar. So how does a nonprofit with limited capacity get up to speed?

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